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Marquette Building
Marquette Building

Marquette Building

Free admission
140 S Dearborn St, Chicago, Illinois, 60603

The Basics

Thanks to its illustrious history, the Marquette building is a popular stop on many Chicago architecture tours. You can also pop into the ornate lobby on your own to admire the Tiffany glass mosaics and bronze relief sculptures that tell the story of the building’s namesake, Father Jacques Marquette. Pick up an informational flier from the attendant, or delve deeper into the building’s history and design at free exhibits behind the lobby.

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Things to Know Before You Go

  • The Marquette Building remains a functional office space, but the lobby is open to the public.

  • Colorful mosaics depict the expedition of Jesuit priest Jacques Marquette, one of the first European settlers in Chicago.

  • The structure is well-preserved thanks to a 4-year restoration completed in 2006.

  • Grab a bite to eat at the upscale Revival Food Hall on the same block, accessible through an annex.

  • The Marquette Building is accessible for wheelchair users.

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How to Get There

The Marquette Building is located at the intersection of Dearborn and Adams streets in downtown Chicago’s Loop district. Parking in the area is limited. To reach the building by public transit, take the L Blue Line to the Monroe Station.

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Trip ideas


When to Get There

The Marquette Building is open seven days a week from early morning to late evening. The Revival Food Hall in the neighboring National Building is open weekdays from early morning to early evening; visit outside of lunch hours to avoid crowds of office workers.

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Chicago Architecture Tours

The Marquette Building stands proud among Chicago's signature skyscrapers, along with iconic structures such as the John Hancock Building and Water Tower. The city was almost completely rebuilt after the Great Chicago Fire in 1871, giving rise to the famed Chicago school of architecture. Guided architecture tours—on foot, by bus, or boat—are a great way to learn more about the city’s most impressive buildings and zoom in on details you might otherwise miss.

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